My life as a goldfish

To mark ten years this month since I finished school, this recently rediscovered essay that I wrote in Upper Sixth takes a light-hearted view of things from a different perspective.

In this essay we will examine life as a goldfish, the benefits and advantages as well as the more negative aspects.  While looking at the specific case study of one particular Carassius auratus, we will also consider the historical and contemporary opinions associated with life as a goldfish in a captive setting.  Although intended to enlighten and inform on the complexities of the goldfish’s existence, the author accepts no responsibility for those of the anti-goldfish lobby such as cats who are offended by this personal account of and view on goldfish life. Continue reading

SLOWING (to be more Sustainable)

My Sister is doing a blog series on Advent at the minute and she asked me to contribute. Check it out if you get a chance.

Florianna's Girl

I asked my bro if he could outline 3 behaviours that we could adopt to ensure we have a more sustainable approach to Advent. You can also find him at  People Planet Prophet

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One of my favorite Christmas traditions is putting up the Christmas tree.

I am a big advocate of getting a real tree. This has probably stemmed from the fact we always got a real tree growing up. We’ve started to make a bit more of a deal about it in the past few years, being intentional about setting aside time to do it. We get all wrapped up and set out in the afternoon, head up to the farm around the corner, spend a bit of time picking the right tree, chat to the farmer, (extract our son from the mud), stick it on the car roof and head home.

Once home, the Christmas tunes get busted…

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Shangri-la

The third and final article in a Himalayan-themed series looks at what we can learn from the people of the region.

In East Asian mythology Shangri-la is a mystical paradise, a magical valley hidden somewhere in the fastness of the Himalayas. Travellers lucky enough to find this perfect place never want to leave, for it surpasses all others in peace, tranquillity and beauty. A fanciful story perhaps, but there just might be a grain of truth in there somewhere. For in remote parts of the Himalayas – as well as in other quieter corners of the planet – we find communities who, as a result of their limited contact with the frenetic modern world, have managed to retain important principles that are cornerstones of any idyllic existence: simplicity, community and ecology. Continue reading