Salvation

Part three of a series on reasons to care for creation.

Since early childhood I have had a particular fascination with the cat family, or Felidae. Of the 37 or so species I’ve had the great privilege to work with 17 of them in captivity, to see two in the wild and to hear a third: it’s a humbling experience to be sleeping outside and in the half-light of morning to hear a leopard calling close by!

During a university summer holiday I was working at a wildlife sanctuary, where, among other animals, I had to look after a tiger called Sonia. And after a few days I had the opportunity to go into her enclosure along with her keeper. Continue reading

Wildly wonderful world

The first part in our series on biblical eco-warriors of the faith looks at Adam.

I was a precocious child. When I was about ten, I wrote in to an agricultural magazine I subscribed to at the time about a glaring error in one of their articles. On a tour of the Netherlands one of their contributors – a poultry expert – had misidentified a breed of cattle he had encountered on his travels. It was not, I informed him in my letter, a belted galloway, as he had assumed. Rather, it was, in fact, a lakenvelder, or Dutch belted.

I didn’t realise it at the time but what I was doing was exactly what our forefather Adam did in the very beginning: observing God’s creation and applying that knowledge. I was also doing two other things just like Adam. I was reflecting the heart of the good, good Father, a wild God who knows and delights in His ‘wildly wonderful world’ (Psalm 104:24, The Message). What’s more, I was taking my place as part of the community of creation, an interconnected part of the Creator’s universe like any other, albeit with a special divine hallmark. These three aspects of Adam’s life tell us much about living well today on planet earth. Continue reading