Project Wild Thing

Check this film out if you get a chance, It is so inspiring.

Breathe

Mark Powley writes about a film trip with a difference.

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A few months ago, with the bitter winter wind whipping the streets of Leeds, Ailsa and I took all four kids out to see Project Wild Thing. ‘One man’s crusade to get kids to fall in love with nature again’. Points gained for watching a nature-y film – 10. Points lost for driving there in the car – 5. Points regained for watching it at an ‘art house’ cinema – 2. Points lost for spending £35 on a family film – 7. Or whatever. Anyway, it wasn’t quite the kind of Sunday afternoon hypnosis in which Pixar excel, but it was brilliant.

The idea of the film is simple, powerful and undeniable. It’s not healthy for kids to spend so little time outdoors. There’s too much fear holding us back from our countryside, and our neighbours. All of us should…

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Climate change and population

On Sunday 6th April Jonny took part in a debate on BBC Radio Ulster’s ‘Sunday Sequence’ program, hosted by Dr William Crawley.  Also taking part were the environmental campaigner Sir Jonathan Porritt and Catholic theologian Professor Tina Beattie.  The discussion focused on the linked issues of population growth and climate change, and Jonny shared a Christian environmental perspective.

You can access the radio program here.  The relevant section is from around 33 minutes to 49 minutes.

Treehugger Gospel

Three trees waymark the Christian story – and our own.

I think that I shall never see a poem lovely as a tree…

Poems are made by fools like me, but only God can make a tree.

Joyce Kilmer

Trees are incredible. They are the pinnacles of creation, the tallest, largest and oldest living things. And while, strictly speaking, algal plants (phytoplankton) in the oceans produce more oxygen than them, it is trees – especially tropical rainforests – that have captured the public’s imagination as the ‘lungs of the planet’. We depend on them for many other practical things too, like timber, nuts and fruit. But we also depend on their beauty and magnificence to enchant and inspire us, to herald the passage of the seasons. A world without trees would be no world at all.

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